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ORGAN
SHARING

At the end of 2013, according to the latest data available from the Canadian Institute for Health Information, 4,433 patients across Canada were on waitlists to receive kidney, heart, lung, liver, pancreas or bowel transplants. The majority (3,382 patients) were waiting to receive kidney or simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplants.

During 2014–2015, the Canadian Transplant Registry and its interprovincial programs — developed and managed by Canadian Blood Services — facilitated and provided greater access to organ transplants, thanks to collaboration and funding from provincial and territorial governments, coordination among health-care partners and greater public awareness.

ORGAN
SHARING

At the end of 2013, according to the latest data available from the Canadian Institute for Health Information, 4,433 patients across Canada were on waitlists to receive kidney, heart, lung, liver, pancreas or bowel transplants. The majority (3,382 patients) were waiting to receive kidney or simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplants.

During 2014–2015, the Canadian Transplant Registry and its interprovincial programs — developed and managed by Canadian Blood Services — facilitated and provided greater access to organ transplants, thanks to collaboration and funding from provincial and territorial governments, coordination among health-care partners and greater public awareness.